Japan: Deep-Sea Drillship Chikyu to Embark on Her Next Mission

The deep-sea drilling vessel Chikyu, operated by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), will embark on her next mission, IODP Expedition 338: The Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) Stage 3 – from 3 October to 13 January 2014, in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment  is a drilling project designed to investigate the role of a mega-splay fault on influencing plate boundary slip and subsequent tsunami generation, mechanisms of earthquake and tsunami generation along the Nankai Trough, and the mechanisms controlling the aseismic–seismic transition along the fault system by using boreholes to collect geological samples and conduct in situ measurements of geological properties and monitoring of crustal deformation.

The drilling project consists of four stages in all, with drilling operations planned at several sites along a line orthogonal to the Nankai Trough in the Kumano Basin, offshore of the Kii Peninsula (see Figure 2).

Operations for this expedition included drilling across the shallow part of the mega-splay fault and plate boundary fault to clarify the properties of the fault that may have slipped during past earthquakes and to characterize subsurface distribution of strata, deformation structures, and the state of stress.

In Stage 2, the upper shallow portion of the seismogenic zone was penetrated to decipher its geologic structure and to set up long-term observatories within boreholes to continuously monitor crustal deformation. Also, to characterize the properties of incoming sediment that ultimately influences plate motion in the seismogenic zone, geological features of the sediment was examined and strata temperatures were measured.

In the stage 3 “ultra-deep” drilling is being performed that can reach the seismogenic zone. Operations include direct core sampling and analysis from the fault on which great earthquakes have repeatedly occurred to understand the geologic characteristics of the seismogenic zone.

In the stage 4, long-term observatories will be deployed in the ultra-deep borehole to monitor minor changes in the earthquake fault and its surrounding crust. Future goals include connecting the borehole sensors set up in Stage 2 to a monitoring network called Dense Ocean-floor Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis, so that real-time data from seismogenic zones can be made available.

 Upcoming expedition 338

This year riser drilling is being done to extend the bore hole drilled in FY2010 to approximately 3,600 m below the seafloor. In FY2013, the goal is to extend this hole down to the megasplay fault (approx. 5,200 m below the seafloor). This expedition will collect data on direct core samples, while simultaneously drilling and logging holes (Logging While Drilling [LWD])

Thw Expedition 338 Science Party comprises co-chief Scientists, namely Brandon Dugan, Professor, Rice University, USA; Kyuichi Kanagawa, Professor, Chiba University, Japan;  Gregory Moore, Professor, University of Hawaii, USA; Michael Strasser, Professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and 27 selected scientists from IODP member countries.

Press Release, September 28, 2012

Share this article

Follow Subsea World News

Events>

<< May 2017 >>
MTWTFSS
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4

UTC 2017

The subsea industry has, as all other parts of the oil & gas industry, been seriously rattled by the most severe downturn in the hydrocarbon energy era. However, the realization of what hit us and actions to be taken to sustain a healthy and profitable future is still on-going – unfortunately with thousands of colleagues paying the price by losing their job as one of the most severe consequences. At this time, there are signs that we have reached bottom in terms of most industry indicators, but few experts expect a sharp recovery. Many seem to believe that a slow recovery is what the industry needs in order to avoid an unsustainable capacity build-up, as seen in the period after the financial crisis. Considering the uncertainty of what the future will bring, this year’s UTC Program Committee have decided to challenge all of us to present ideas, experiences, technological innovations, business models and execution models for how to shape our subsea future and explain how and why subsea is the future.
UTC welcomes abstracts based on the topics listed below. If selected, please consider writing a paper in addition to the UTC presentation. From 2017, UTC papers will be published in an international database.

More info

read more >

EIC Connect Oil & Gas UAE 2017

This one-day event, focusing on the oil and gas sector, will explore opportunities in the Middle East whilst recognising the challenges that…

read more >

Decom Offshore 2017

Decom Offshore 2017 is expected to bring together a global audience of over 400 key representatives from the late life and decommissioning…

read more >

IMCA ROV SEMINAR

This seminar is designed to assist IMCA members in dealing with these, with a programme of technical and operational topics affecting…

read more >