IMCA Produces Two Information Notes (UK)

IMCA Produces Two Information Notes (UK)

The International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA) has produced two information notes – ‘Diving on Offshore Renewable Energy Projects: Regulations and Guidance’, and ‘The Inspection and Auditing of Manned and Unmanned Barges’ which are of use, and interest, to those involved with offshore renewable energy projects.

“As an increasing number of our members become involved with the offshore renewable energy sectors, we believe it is useful to them, and indeed to their clients, to have basic information in an easily digestible form,” says Jane Bugler, Technical Director of IMCA. “For example, the aim of the diving information note (IMCA M 18/12) is very much to assist all parties in a diving contract on an offshore renewable energy project in finding regulations and guidance to help deliver safe and efficient diving services. The stakeholders include clients, diving contractors and authorities.

“The offshore commercial diving industry is subject to various regulations, standards, codes and guidelines which will be imposed by national governments of a particular area, the clients (and their agents) who wish the work to be carried out, the insurers of the diving contractor or other organisations. Some of these diving contractors will be IMCA members and some of the clients will specifically request that IMCA guidance is followed during diving operations. In just a page and a half we highlight the aims of our guidance – particularly IMCA D 014 – ‘IMCA international code of practice for offshore diving’, and also the suite of documents which relate to it. We also provide links to other guidance and regulations that will be of interest and use to the renewable energy industry.”

Manned and ‘dumb’ barges

IMCA M 20/12 ‘The Inspection and Auditing of Manned and Unmanned Barges’ is similarly short, and provides easily assimilated information.

A dumb barge is a vessel that is unmanned during transits, does not have its own propulsion and must be either towed or pushed to its destination. It is used for the carriage of cargo or equipment. The information note gives further information on the definition of “does not have its own propulsion” and looks at regulations that must be complied with.

For inspection purposes IMCA M 149 – ‘Common Marine Inspection Document (CMID)’ – available free of charge to members and non-members alike from the IMCA website, may be used if the barge is fitted with accommodation. If the barge is not fitted with accommodation, then IMCA M 189 Rev 2 – ‘Marine inspection for small workboats (Common marine inspection document for small workboats)’ – also provides useful information (again this is available free of charge). A useful table in the Information Note shows certification that may be applicable for both unmanned or manned barges.

The two-page document also outlines components of towing systems, all of which needs to be inspected and certification checked; and provides information on the location of Statutory Instruments for deck equipment such as generators, cranes, pumps, etc.

Press Release, October 09, 2012

Share this article

Follow Subsea World News

Events>

<< May 2017 >>
MTWTFSS
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4

OGA 2017

OGA 2017 is the most beneficial way to meet, discuss and acquire the latest in the Oil & Gas industry! It is also;…

read more >

IMCA ROV SEMINAR

This seminar is designed to assist IMCA members in dealing with these, with a programme of technical and operational topics affecting…

read more >

Offshore Wind Energy 2017

In 2017, EWEA and RenewableUK will join forces to bring you the greatest conference and exhibition Europe has ever known in the history…

read more >

UTC 2017

The subsea industry has, as all other parts of the oil & gas industry, been seriously rattled by the most severe downturn in the hydrocarbon energy era. However, the realization of what hit us and actions to be taken to sustain a healthy and profitable future is still on-going – unfortunately with thousands of colleagues paying the price by losing their job as one of the most severe consequences. At this time, there are signs that we have reached bottom in terms of most industry indicators, but few experts expect a sharp recovery. Many seem to believe that a slow recovery is what the industry needs in order to avoid an unsustainable capacity build-up, as seen in the period after the financial crisis. Considering the uncertainty of what the future will bring, this year’s UTC Program Committee have decided to challenge all of us to present ideas, experiences, technological innovations, business models and execution models for how to shape our subsea future and explain how and why subsea is the future.
UTC welcomes abstracts based on the topics listed below. If selected, please consider writing a paper in addition to the UTC presentation. From 2017, UTC papers will be published in an international database.

More info

read more >